Module 05 Course Project – Quantum Mechanics Research Paper

Module 05 Course Project – Quantum Mechanics Research Paper

Module 05 Content

  1. In a two-page paper, research three examples of technologies that use quantum mechanics. Explain, in your own words, how these applications impact society. If you or someone you know has ever had an MRI scan for a medical diagnosis, you have experienced the result of quantum physics for measuring bodily structures. Finally, provide another specific example from your own life (CT OF THE ABDOMEN) that could be influenced by these applications.

    Paper must use a minimum of two source, use proper spelling and grammar, and follow APA format.

Discussion

Discussion

 

Newton’s Third Law of Motion states that for every action (force) there is an equal and opposite reaction (force). This means that all forces exist in pairs. In this discussion, describe three everyday examples of Newton’s Third Law. For each example, identify the force pairs. (Hint: Choosing simple examples will greatly help in identifying the forces.) Be careful—often more than one force pair is acting on an object. Be creative! 

Finally, be sure to respond to at least two of your peers’ posts. 

Your response should be a minimum of three posts.

help with 10 question

help with 10 question

 

Evaluate whether each of these statements is true (T) or false (F).  For each statement briefly explain why the answer is either true or false. Please use complete sentences.

  1. The habitable zone around a star more massive than our Sun would be further in separation.
  2. Earth presently is the only planet in the solar system known to have plate tectonics.
  3. Without greenhouse gases, Earthʹs surface would be frozen over.
  4. The Sun generates energy primarily by nuclear fission.
  5. The Martian atmosphere was lost over time due to a reduced magentosphere.
  6. The Galilean Moons orbit Jupiter because they were gravitationally captured 100 million years ago.
  7. Solar-like stars are the most common type of stars in the Milky Way galaxy.
  8. An astronaut on a spaceship does a round trip to our nearest star at 50% of the speed of light. The astronaut experiences time slower compared to Earth’s time. 
  9. The Turing Test has never been passed by any machine on Earth.
  10. Oxygen was abundant in Earth’s atmosphere when life first arose on Earth.

help with questions

help with questions

 

Part II. SHORT ANSWER [100 pts]: Answer each question with at least five complete sentences or more.

11. [20 pts] Describe what evidence exists that there was liquid water on the surface of Mars in the past and what happened to that water.

12. [20 pts] Describe two major observational methods for detecting extrasolar planets indirectly? For each method explain what planetary properties can be measured from each method.

13. [20 pts] What is tidal heating? Describe what evidence exists that there is tidal heating on Europa and discuss the type of habitable conditions that would be present if life did exist on this moon.

14. [20 pts] A common theme in science fiction is “leaving home” to find a new planet for humans to live on. Now that we know about thousands of exoplanets, we can start imagining how to choose one. Describe the characteristics that we would look for in a planetary system that would make for a good home for humans. [Hint: think about life’s prerequisites and planetary system properties.] 

15. [20 pts] Make your own estimate of the Drake Equation. Please explain your reasoning about the values selected for each of the variables of the Drake Equation. Does your estimate of N match your view of the probability of Life and Civilizations in the Universe? Why or why not?

Physics problems

Physics problems

 you will need to complete homework questions specified below. You need to complete the work and upload the file here. You need to show all the calculations in your worksheet. 

Please solve the following questions:

8.1 – Q. 19

8.2 – Q. 25

8.3 – Q. 31

8.4 – Q. 45

8.5 – Q. 53

PreviousNext 

Physics Lab

Physics Lab

Spring Constant – A Virtual PhET Lab After completing this lab activity, the students should be able to:

  • Conduct an experiment to determine the spring constant
  • Calculate the spring constant
  • Write a lab report

Lab ReportThe lab report must include the following:

  • Title
  • Introduction
  • Experimental Details or Theoretical Analysis
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusions and Summary
  • References

Please visit the following website to learn more about lab reports:ACS Format for Laboratory Reports (Links to an external site.)An example of a lab report is given on the following website:Professor K – sample lab report (Links to an external site.)Lab ActivityPlease follow the steps given below to conduct the experiment:

  • This lab requires you to produce a lab report to determine The Spring Constant of a Spring.” This is the “Title” of your lab report.
  • Read the relevant chapter on spring constant and Hooke’s law and add an “Introduction.”

You conduct this lab by connecting to the PhET website by clicking on the link given below (or where applicable through the embedded simulation on the lab page):‪‪Masses and Springs‬  (Links to an external site.)Attribution:PhET Interactive Simulations (Links to an external site.) University of Colorado Boulder  (If you cannot use the above simulation or cannot get to the website by clicking on the link, please copy and paste the link into your browser. If the simulation is not running, please check if you have the latest Java, Adobe Flash, or HTML5 software [depending on the simulated lab]. If you download the relevant software and attempt to run the simulation and it is still not working, please call the IT helpdesk. It also could be that your computer does not have sufficient space to run the simulation. Please check all the possibilities).

  • For this experiment, you use the “Lab” section of the simulation. After you click the lab section of the simulation, select “Displacement/Natural Length,” “Mass Equilibrium,” and “Movable Line” boxes (upper right-hand corner). Then, select “Earth” and the correct gravity value will appear. Move the “Damping” scale to “Lots” extreme. This will stop the spring bouncing up and down. Now, select the “Spring Constant” scale to the middle (middle of the simulation).  Now you can change the “Mass” values as you desired, but you must have at least three different mass values and conduct the experiment that will enable you to find the spring constant by plotting a graph. Once you find the spring constant from the graph, find the masses of the two unknown objects – Red and Blue. You find these masses without changing the spring constant scale, since you will use the spring constant value you found from the graph to find the unknown mass. This information constitutes the “Experimental Details” section of the lab report. You must keep a record of all the values appearing on the screen as experimental values for the scenario. These values also form part of the “Results” section of the lab report. Now, complete the theoretical calculations including the plotting of the graph. These calculated values and the graph form the “Results” section of the lab report.
  • Now, you can complete the “Discussion” section of your lab report by comparing the values and discussing any differences in the theoretical and experimental values and any other information relevant to the experiment.
  • Complete the lab report by adding a summary to the “Conclusion” section of your lab report.
  • Submit the lab report to the relevant Canvas Dropbox

Please watch the following video to learn more about Newton’s Second Law and Momentum:Two ways to find the spring constant – WITH GRAPHS – YouTube (Links to an external site.)Lab Scenario

  1. Calculate the spring constant of the spring by graph method.
  2. Calculate the masses of red and blue objects.

Physics Lab

Physics Lab

Kinetic Energies and Momentum – A Virtual PhET Lab After completing this lab activity, the students should be able to:

  • Calculate kinetic energies
  • Calculate momentum and final velocities
  • Write a lab report

Lab ReportThe lab report must include the following:

  • Title
  • Introduction
  • Experimental Details or Theoretical Analysis
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusions and Summary
  • References

Please visit the following website to learn more about lab reports:ACS Format for Laboratory Reports  (Links to an external site.)An example of a lab report is given on the following website:Professor K – sample lab report (Links to an external site.)Lab ActivityPlease follow the steps given below to conduct the experiment:

  • This lab requires you to produce a lab report to, determine “Momentum, Final Velocities, and Kinetic Energy.” This is the “Title” of your lab report.
  • Read the relevant chapter on momentum and kinetic energy and add an “Introduction.”

You conduct this lab by connecting to the PhET website by clicking on the link given below (or where applicable through the embedded simulation on the lab page):Collision Lab‬ (colorado.edu) (Links to an external site.) Attribution:PhET Interactive Simulations University of Colorado Boulder https://phet.colorado.edu(If you cannot use the above simulation or cannot get to the website by clicking on the link, please copy and paste the link into your browser. If the simulation is not running, please check if you have the latest Java, Adobe Flash, or HTML5 software [depending on the simulated lab]. If you download the relevant software and attempt to run the simulation and it is still not working, please call the IT helpdesk. It also could be that your computer does not have sufficient space to run the simulation. Please check all the possibilities).

  • For this experiment, you use the “Intro” section of the lab. After you click the intro section of the lab, select “Velocity,” “Kinetic Energy,” and “Values” boxes (upper right-hand corner). Then, move the “Elasticity” scale to 100% elastic. Then check the box “More Data” (bottom left-hand side). Now all the values will appear on the screen.  Now you can change the mass values and the initial velocity values as per the scenario given below, and kinetic energy, momenta, and velocity values will appear on the screen. This information constitutes the “Experimental Details” section of the lab report. You must keep a record of all the values appearing on the screen as experimental values for the scenario. These values form part of the “Results” section of the lab report. Now, complete the theoretical calculations of kinetic energy, final velocities, and momenta for each scenario using relevant equations. These calculated values also form the “Results” section of the lab report.
  • Now, you can complete the “Discussion” section of your lab report by comparing the values and discussing any differences in the theoretical and experimental values and any other information relevant to the experiment.
  • Complete the lab report by adding a summary to the “Conclusion” section of your lab report.
  • Submit the lab report to the relevant Canvas Dropbox

Please watch the following video to learn more about Newton’s Second Law and Momentum:Newton’s second law & momentum (video) | Khan Academy (Links to an external site.)Lab ScenarioSet the pink ball mass as 2 kg mass and the blue ball mass as 3kg. The position of blue ball could be -1 and pink ball could be +1. Set the initial velocity of pink ball as -1.5 m/s and that of the blue ball as +3 m/s. Run the experiment and note all the relevant experimental values. 

  1. Calculate the initial and final kinetic energy values for both balls separately and then the total.
  2. Calculate the momenta before and after the collision for each ball.
  3. Calculate the final velocity values for each ball.

Physics lab assignment

Physics lab assignment

 

Spring Constant – A Virtual PhET Lab

 After completing this lab activity, the students should be able to:

  • Conduct an experiment to determine the spring constant
  • Calculate the spring constant
  • Write a lab report

Lab Report

The lab report must include the following:

  • Title
  • Introduction
  • Experimental Details or Theoretical Analysis
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusions and Summary
  • References

Please visit the following website to learn more about lab reports:

ACS Format for Laboratory Reports (Links to an external site.)

An example of a lab report is given on the following website:

Professor K – sample lab report (Links to an external site.)

Lab Activity

Please follow the steps given below to conduct the experiment:

  • This lab requires you to produce a lab report to determine The Spring Constant of a Spring.” This is the “Title” of your lab report.
  • Read the relevant chapter on spring constant and Hooke’s law and add an “Introduction.”

You conduct this lab by connecting to the PhET website by clicking on the link given below (or where applicable through the embedded simulation on the lab page):

‪Masses and Springs‬  (Links to an external site.)

Attribution:

PhET Interactive Simulations (Links to an external site.)
University of Colorado Boulder

(If you cannot use the above simulation or cannot get to the website by clicking on the link, please copy and paste the link into your browser. If the simulation is not running, please check if you have the latest Java, Adobe Flash, or HTML5 software [depending on the simulated lab]. If you download the relevant software and attempt to run the simulation and it is still not working, please call the IT helpdesk. It also could be that your computer does not have sufficient space to run the simulation. Please check all the possibilities).

  • For this experiment, you use the “Lab” section of the simulation. After you click the lab section of the simulation, select “Displacement/Natural Length,” “Mass Equilibrium,” and “Movable Line” boxes (upper right-hand corner). Then, select “Earth” and the correct gravity value will appear. Move the “Damping” scale to “Lots” extreme. This will stop the spring bouncing up and down. Now, select the “Spring Constant” scale to the middle (middle of the simulation).  Now you can change the “Mass” values as you desired, but you must have at least three different mass values and conduct the experiment that will enable you to find the spring constant by plotting a graph. Once you find the spring constant from the graph, find the masses of the two unknown objects – Red and Blue. You find these masses without changing the spring constant scale, since you will use the spring constant value you found from the graph to find the unknown mass. This information constitutes the “Experimental Details” section of the lab report. You must keep a record of all the values appearing on the screen as experimental values for the scenario. These values also form part of the “Results” section of the lab report. Now, complete the theoretical calculations including the plotting of the graph. These calculated values and the graph form the “Results” section of the lab report.
  • Now, you can complete the “Discussion” section of your lab report by comparing the values and discussing any differences in the theoretical and experimental values and any other information relevant to the experiment.
  • Complete the lab report by adding a summary to the “Conclusion” section of your lab report.
  • Submit the lab report to the relevant Canvas Dropbox

Please watch the following video to learn more about Newton’s Second Law and Momentum:

Two ways to find the spring constant – WITH GRAPHS – YouTube (Links to an external site.)

Lab Scenario

  1. Calculate the spring constant of the spring by graph method.
  2. Calculate the masses of red and blue objects.

 

Discussion

Discussion

Newton’s Third Law of Motion states that for every action (force) there is an equal and opposite reaction (force). This means that all forces exist in pairs. In this discussion, describe three everyday examples of Newton’s Third Law. For each example, identify the force pairs. (Hint: Choosing simple examples will greatly help in identifying the forces.) Be careful—often more than one force pair is acting on an object. Be creative! 

Finally, be sure to respond to at least two of your peers’ posts. 

Your response should be a minimum of three posts.

Discussion assignment

Discussion assignment

  Describe the importance of a universal standard measuring system (SI units) in scientific work. Include at least two examples of real-life situations in which the use (or non-use) of SI units affected the outcome of the situation. In many countries, SI units are standard, but this is not true in the United States. In your opinion, why have we not adopted SI units in the United States? Do you think the United States will (or should) in the future?