The Wizard of OZ 1939 Theatrical Review

The Wizard of OZ 1939 Theatrical Review

Become a Theatrical Reviewer Attend or Watch (TV or online) The Wizard of OZ.

Write a short review in which you: 1. Briefly summarize the story, comment on the authors plotting of the story, indicate the significance of the work (or lack thereof), 2. decide whether the production was a success or failure, indicate whether the author, director, actors, set, lights, sound attributed to the success or failure of the production.

Critical think

Critical think

1. Many works of early American literature deal with the theme of perseverance of an individual. Discuss how you see the theme of perseverance and how it is important to the literary text as a whole by choosing one of the following: John Smith’s The General History, The Third Book, “Chapter II”; the assigned selections from Mary Rowlandson’s A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration; the assigned selections from Benjamin Franklin’s The Autobiography; or, “Chapters 2, 3, and 7” of Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative.

2. Early colonial writers often had different perspective on the “New World” and its inhabitants. Compare and contrate two of the following three colonial perspectives: John Smith’s The General History, “The Third Book”, “Chapter II”; William Bradford’s Of Plymouth Plantation, Book I, “Chapter IX”; and Thomas Morton’s New English Canaan, “Chapters IV, XV, XIV, and XV.”

3. Many of the works we have read include references to biblical scripture. Discuss the role that biblical scripture plays in the overall narrative or poem of two-three authors we have covered.

4. Based on your reading of J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s “What Is an American?” and Thomas Paine’s “The American Crisis,” discuss how those works helped create the ideals of the emerging American republic.

5. The first four weeks of the course had the general theme of literature as history of early America. Explain how you understand that theme by discussing three different texts from the first four weeks of the course.

6. Compare and contrast the poems of Anne Bradstreet and Phillis Wheatley by writing about one assigned poem for each.

7. American Romanticism often involves stories and poems that connect the fantastical or the supernatural to the struggles of an individual character. Discuss how you see the importance of the fantastical or the supernatural to the events of the story or poem in Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle,” Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven,” or Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher.”

The Wizard of OZ 1939 Theatrical Review

The Wizard of OZ 1939 Theatrical Review

Become a Theatrical Reviewer Attend or Watch (TV or online) The Wizard of OZ.

Write a short review in which you: 1. Briefly summarize the story, comment on the authors plotting of the story, indicate the significance of the work (or lack thereof), 2. decide whether the production was a success or failure, indicate whether the author, director, actors, set, lights, sound attributed to the success or failure of the production.

Critical think

Critical think

1. Many works of early American literature deal with the theme of perseverance of an individual. Discuss how you see the theme of perseverance and how it is important to the literary text as a whole by choosing one of the following: John Smith’s The General History, The Third Book, “Chapter II”; the assigned selections from Mary Rowlandson’s A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration; the assigned selections from Benjamin Franklin’s The Autobiography; or, “Chapters 2, 3, and 7” of Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative.

2. Early colonial writers often had different perspective on the “New World” and its inhabitants. Compare and contrate two of the following three colonial perspectives: John Smith’s The General History, “The Third Book”, “Chapter II”; William Bradford’s Of Plymouth Plantation, Book I, “Chapter IX”; and Thomas Morton’s New English Canaan, “Chapters IV, XV, XIV, and XV.”

3. Many of the works we have read include references to biblical scripture. Discuss the role that biblical scripture plays in the overall narrative or poem of two-three authors we have covered.

4. Based on your reading of J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s “What Is an American?” and Thomas Paine’s “The American Crisis,” discuss how those works helped create the ideals of the emerging American republic.

5. The first four weeks of the course had the general theme of literature as history of early America. Explain how you understand that theme by discussing three different texts from the first four weeks of the course.

6. Compare and contrast the poems of Anne Bradstreet and Phillis Wheatley by writing about one assigned poem for each.

7. American Romanticism often involves stories and poems that connect the fantastical or the supernatural to the struggles of an individual character. Discuss how you see the importance of the fantastical or the supernatural to the events of the story or poem in Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle,” Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven,” or Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher.”

How is boldness reflected in the characters of Rebecca Harding Davis’s story?

How is boldness reflected in the characters of Rebecca Harding Davis’s story?

You learned the definition of the American Dream in this week’s lecture. You also learned about the American identity. Traits often associated with the American identity include boldness, confidence, perseverance, and integrity. These traits are often demonstrated through a character’s words or actions. This week, we’ll focus on boldness. How is boldness reflected in the characters of Rebecca Harding Davis’s story? Choose two characters from “Life in the Iron Mills” and explain how boldness applies to them in the story.

  • 300 words minimum (excluding quotations and citations)
  • Include two properly integrated and cited direct quotations (one related to each character) to support your claims. See the Literary Analysis Tools Module from this week’s activities for information about integrating and citing direct quotations.

The Wizard of OZ 1939 Theatrical Review

The Wizard of OZ 1939 Theatrical Review

Become a Theatrical Reviewer Attend or Watch (TV or online) The Wizard of OZ.

Write a short review in which you: 1. Briefly summarize the story, comment on the authors plotting of the story, indicate the significance of the work (or lack thereof), 2. decide whether the production was a success or failure, indicate whether the author, director, actors, set, lights, sound attributed to the success or failure of the production.

Critical think

Critical think

1. Many works of early American literature deal with the theme of perseverance of an individual. Discuss how you see the theme of perseverance and how it is important to the literary text as a whole by choosing one of the following: John Smith’s The General History, The Third Book, “Chapter II”; the assigned selections from Mary Rowlandson’s A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration; the assigned selections from Benjamin Franklin’s The Autobiography; or, “Chapters 2, 3, and 7” of Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative.

2. Early colonial writers often had different perspective on the “New World” and its inhabitants. Compare and contrate two of the following three colonial perspectives: John Smith’s The General History, “The Third Book”, “Chapter II”; William Bradford’s Of Plymouth Plantation, Book I, “Chapter IX”; and Thomas Morton’s New English Canaan, “Chapters IV, XV, XIV, and XV.”

3. Many of the works we have read include references to biblical scripture. Discuss the role that biblical scripture plays in the overall narrative or poem of two-three authors we have covered.

4. Based on your reading of J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s “What Is an American?” and Thomas Paine’s “The American Crisis,” discuss how those works helped create the ideals of the emerging American republic.

5. The first four weeks of the course had the general theme of literature as history of early America. Explain how you understand that theme by discussing three different texts from the first four weeks of the course.

6. Compare and contrast the poems of Anne Bradstreet and Phillis Wheatley by writing about one assigned poem for each.

7. American Romanticism often involves stories and poems that connect the fantastical or the supernatural to the struggles of an individual character. Discuss how you see the importance of the fantastical or the supernatural to the events of the story or poem in Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle,” Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven,” or Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher.”

Article review

Article review

Article review on: Ethics and Social Responsibility in Marketing Channels and Supply Chains: An Overview (attach is the pdf) 

  1. Provide an overview of the authors’ primary thesis;
  2. identify and discuss at least five key issues raised by the book that are relevant to public relations and advertising ethics and social responsibility; and (Please divide the five key issues in sub titles) 
  3. Explain at least five “lessons learned” from reading the book that could be applied to the effective and ethical practice of global strategic communications. (Please divide the five “lessons learned” in subtitles) 

Minimum of 1,500 words.

Course readings and article passages should be incorporated as appropriate. I will attach the course readings 

Literary

Literary

Choose one literary text from the following list: John Smith’s The General History, “The Third Book–Chapter II,” William Bradford’s Of Plymouth Plantation, “Book I–Chapter IX,” Thomas Morton’s New English Canaan, “Chapters IV, XV, XIV, and XV,” Anne Bradstreet’s “Prologue,” “The Author to Her Book,” “Before the Birth of One of Her Children,” “To My Dear and Loving Husband,” “A Letter to Her Husband, Absent Upon Public Employment” and “Upon the Burning of Our House, July 10th, 1666,” Mary Rowlandson’s A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration, or Ben Franklin’s The Autobiography.

american lit

american lit

 

Watch either The Great Gatsby or The Color Purple and relate it to “The Way to Wealth”

The American Dream lecture in Week 1 points out that Poor Richard’s Almanac was an annual publication that included calendar lists, home recipes, weather forecasts, etc. What made Franklin’s almanac unlike other almanacs was the inclusion of Franklin’s witty parables and humorous writings. The maxims below relate to Franklin’s ideas of working hard, avoiding debt, and working toward attaining a virtuous character. Choose three maxims and align them with a character or characters in either The Color Purple or The Great Gatsby. For example, you might choose Celie from The Color Purple and discuss maxims 1, 4, and 6; or, you might choose The Great Gatsby and align Daisy with maxim 4, Tom with maxim 5, and Nick with maxim 6. You will be providing quotes from the film you select to support your observations about each character/maxim in your writing.

Choose Three of These Maxims from “The Way to Wealth”

1. “There are no gains without pains”

2. “Do not squander time, for that’s the stuff life made of”

3. “Fools make feasts, and wise men eat them”

4. “He that lives upon hope will die fasting”

5. “The second vice is lying, the first is running in debt”

6. “If you will not hear reason, she’ll surely rap your knuckles”

Your thesis statement should follow this template: 

Three maxims from Franklin’s “The Way to Wealth” that the characters embody in The Color Purple (or The Great Gatsby) are _____, _____, and _____.