Chemistry reflection

Chemistry reflection

Reflection

Instructions

Please respond to the following questions based upon these course objectives:

  • Explain basic atomic structure.
  • Interpret the Periodic Table of Elements.
  • Analyze the principles of chemical reactions.
  • Apply the scientific method to experimental data.
  • Apply principles of measurement.

Please answer the following questions with supporting examples and full explanations.

  • For each of the learning objectives, provide an analysis of how the course supported each objective.
  • Explain how the material learned in this course, based upon the objectives, will be applicable to professional application.

Reflect back on your journey through this course and answer the following:

  • What topic in the course did you find most interesting and applicable?
  • Thoughts on your learning in the course?

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with citations and references in APA format.

Chemistry reflection

Chemistry reflection

Reflection

Instructions

Please respond to the following questions based upon these course objectives:

  • Explain basic atomic structure.
  • Interpret the Periodic Table of Elements.
  • Analyze the principles of chemical reactions.
  • Apply the scientific method to experimental data.
  • Apply principles of measurement.

Please answer the following questions with supporting examples and full explanations.

  • For each of the learning objectives, provide an analysis of how the course supported each objective.
  • Explain how the material learned in this course, based upon the objectives, will be applicable to professional application.

Reflect back on your journey through this course and answer the following:

  • What topic in the course did you find most interesting and applicable?
  • Thoughts on your learning in the course?

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with citations and references in APA format.

Chemistry study guide help

Chemistry study guide help

 

340. mL of liquid acetone has a mass of 269 g. Density= ? g/ml

430. mL of concentrated liquid nitric acid has a mass of 645g. Density = ? g/mL

4.57 of ammonia gas has a mass of 3.52 g. Density= ?g/L

A 390.-cm3 block of calcium metal (Ca) has a mass of 605 g. Density = g/cm3

Chemistry

Chemistry

Organic Molecules

Instructions

Please complete the following steps for your discussion post and response.

Choose a drug or vitamin of interest

  • Using PowerPoint, insert the structure of your compound.
  • Using the DRAW feature of PowerPoint, identify the functional groups by circling or highlighting them and label each functional group.  Here are videos for help with drawing in PowerPoint
  • Find the function of the molecule and relate the function to the functional group(s) that they have. (i.e. How does the structure of the molecule relate to its function?)

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with citations and references in APA format.

Report #6 Activity Series

Report #6 Activity Series

Virtual Lab:  Activity Series

Background:  

The usefulness of metals in structural and other applications depends on their physical and chemical
properties. Although iron is the most common metal used in manufacturing, it must be protected against
corrosion because rusts easily. Copper is used in electrical wiring because it conducts electricity extremely well and resists corrosion better than many metals. Gold is a highly valuable jewelry metal because it is essentially unreactive. How can we determine the relative reactivity of different metals?

To determine the activity of metals you can compare the reactions of metals with different
metal ions. Consider equation 1 and 2 below: 

2Al(s) + 3CuCl2(aq)  –>   2AlCl3(aq) + 3Cu(s)    (Equation 1)

Cu(s)  + AlCl3(aq)     –>    No Reaction             (Equation 2)

The reaction of aluminum with copper (II) chloride (Equation 1) is classified as a single replacement reaction – aluminum reacts with and “replaces” copper ions in copper (II) chloride. Single replacement reactions will occur spontaneously in one direction only (compare Equations 1 and 2). A more active metal always replaces the ion of a less active metal. In general, the activity of a metal may be defined as follows:

An active metal will react with a compound of a less active metal, which is converted to its “free element” form. The more active metal forms a new compound containing metal cations. Based on Equation 1, aluminum is more active than copper and therefore replaces the copper (this is called a single replacement reaction). 


Objective:

-To explore the reactivity of metals 
-To practice writing single replacement reactions
-To practice using the activity series chart in your reference table

Procedure:

1.  Click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.
teachchemistry.org/classroom-resources/metals-in-aqueous-solutions-simulation
2.  Click Activity 1.
3.  Click CONTINUE at the bottom.  
4.  Pick Mg metal and click CONTINUE.
5.  Click on each beaker to see the “molecular scale”
6.  In data table 1,  if a reaction occurred, write “reaction.” If no reaction occurs write “no reaction”.
7.  In table 2, write the balanced equations for the reactions that occured.  (Hint: these are single replacement reactions)

8.  Now repeat steps 1-7 for the next three metals (Cu, Zn and Ag).

Data/Results:

TABLE 1

Picture

TABLE 2

Picture

Questions:

1.  Which of the metals reacted with the most solutions?

2.  Which of the metals reacted with the fewest solutions?

3.  List the 4 Metals in order from the most reactive to the least reactive.

4.  Refer to table J in your reference table.  This is the activity series which lists the most reactive metals on top and the least reactive on the bottom.  Compare your answer to question #3 with the activity series.  Are your results in the same order?  Why?  (Click here for Table J)

5.  If we added Pb to the list, which of the solutions would you expect it to react with?

All these information above for illustration make  a report based on the youtube link https://youtu.be/VatDpKMJ-BU 
And the rubric 

Report #6 Activity Series

Report #6 Activity Series

Virtual Lab:  Activity Series

Background:  

The usefulness of metals in structural and other applications depends on their physical and chemical
properties. Although iron is the most common metal used in manufacturing, it must be protected against
corrosion because rusts easily. Copper is used in electrical wiring because it conducts electricity extremely well and resists corrosion better than many metals. Gold is a highly valuable jewelry metal because it is essentially unreactive. How can we determine the relative reactivity of different metals?

To determine the activity of metals you can compare the reactions of metals with different
metal ions. Consider equation 1 and 2 below: 

2Al(s) + 3CuCl2(aq)  –>   2AlCl3(aq) + 3Cu(s)    (Equation 1)

Cu(s)  + AlCl3(aq)     –>    No Reaction             (Equation 2)

The reaction of aluminum with copper (II) chloride (Equation 1) is classified as a single replacement reaction – aluminum reacts with and “replaces” copper ions in copper (II) chloride. Single replacement reactions will occur spontaneously in one direction only (compare Equations 1 and 2). A more active metal always replaces the ion of a less active metal. In general, the activity of a metal may be defined as follows:

An active metal will react with a compound of a less active metal, which is converted to its “free element” form. The more active metal forms a new compound containing metal cations. Based on Equation 1, aluminum is more active than copper and therefore replaces the copper (this is called a single replacement reaction). 


Objective:

-To explore the reactivity of metals 
-To practice writing single replacement reactions
-To practice using the activity series chart in your reference table

Procedure:

1.  Click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.
teachchemistry.org/classroom-resources/metals-in-aqueous-solutions-simulation
2.  Click Activity 1.
3.  Click CONTINUE at the bottom.  
4.  Pick Mg metal and click CONTINUE.
5.  Click on each beaker to see the “molecular scale”
6.  In data table 1,  if a reaction occurred, write “reaction.” If no reaction occurs write “no reaction”.
7.  In table 2, write the balanced equations for the reactions that occured.  (Hint: these are single replacement reactions)

8.  Now repeat steps 1-7 for the next three metals (Cu, Zn and Ag).

Data/Results:

TABLE 1

Picture

TABLE 2

Picture

Questions:

1.  Which of the metals reacted with the most solutions?

2.  Which of the metals reacted with the fewest solutions?

3.  List the 4 Metals in order from the most reactive to the least reactive.

4.  Refer to table J in your reference table.  This is the activity series which lists the most reactive metals on top and the least reactive on the bottom.  Compare your answer to question #3 with the activity series.  Are your results in the same order?  Why?  (Click here for Table J)

5.  If we added Pb to the list, which of the solutions would you expect it to react with?

All these information above for illustration make  a report based on the youtube link https://youtu.be/VatDpKMJ-BU 
And the rubric 

Report #6 Activity Series

Report #6 Activity Series

Virtual Lab:  Activity Series

Background:  

The usefulness of metals in structural and other applications depends on their physical and chemical
properties. Although iron is the most common metal used in manufacturing, it must be protected against
corrosion because rusts easily. Copper is used in electrical wiring because it conducts electricity extremely well and resists corrosion better than many metals. Gold is a highly valuable jewelry metal because it is essentially unreactive. How can we determine the relative reactivity of different metals?

To determine the activity of metals you can compare the reactions of metals with different
metal ions. Consider equation 1 and 2 below: 

2Al(s) + 3CuCl2(aq)  –>   2AlCl3(aq) + 3Cu(s)    (Equation 1)

Cu(s)  + AlCl3(aq)     –>    No Reaction             (Equation 2)

The reaction of aluminum with copper (II) chloride (Equation 1) is classified as a single replacement reaction – aluminum reacts with and “replaces” copper ions in copper (II) chloride. Single replacement reactions will occur spontaneously in one direction only (compare Equations 1 and 2). A more active metal always replaces the ion of a less active metal. In general, the activity of a metal may be defined as follows:

An active metal will react with a compound of a less active metal, which is converted to its “free element” form. The more active metal forms a new compound containing metal cations. Based on Equation 1, aluminum is more active than copper and therefore replaces the copper (this is called a single replacement reaction). 


Objective:

-To explore the reactivity of metals 
-To practice writing single replacement reactions
-To practice using the activity series chart in your reference table

Procedure:

1.  Click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.
teachchemistry.org/classroom-resources/metals-in-aqueous-solutions-simulation
2.  Click Activity 1.
3.  Click CONTINUE at the bottom.  
4.  Pick Mg metal and click CONTINUE.
5.  Click on each beaker to see the “molecular scale”
6.  In data table 1,  if a reaction occurred, write “reaction.” If no reaction occurs write “no reaction”.
7.  In table 2, write the balanced equations for the reactions that occured.  (Hint: these are single replacement reactions)

8.  Now repeat steps 1-7 for the next three metals (Cu, Zn and Ag).

Data/Results:

TABLE 1

Picture

TABLE 2

Picture

Questions:

1.  Which of the metals reacted with the most solutions?

2.  Which of the metals reacted with the fewest solutions?

3.  List the 4 Metals in order from the most reactive to the least reactive.

4.  Refer to table J in your reference table.  This is the activity series which lists the most reactive metals on top and the least reactive on the bottom.  Compare your answer to question #3 with the activity series.  Are your results in the same order?  Why?  (Click here for Table J)

5.  If we added Pb to the list, which of the solutions would you expect it to react with?

All these information above for illustration make  a report based on the youtube link https://youtu.be/VatDpKMJ-BU 
And the rubric 

Report #6 Activity Series

Report #6 Activity Series

Virtual Lab:  Activity Series

Background:  

The usefulness of metals in structural and other applications depends on their physical and chemical
properties. Although iron is the most common metal used in manufacturing, it must be protected against
corrosion because rusts easily. Copper is used in electrical wiring because it conducts electricity extremely well and resists corrosion better than many metals. Gold is a highly valuable jewelry metal because it is essentially unreactive. How can we determine the relative reactivity of different metals?

To determine the activity of metals you can compare the reactions of metals with different
metal ions. Consider equation 1 and 2 below: 

2Al(s) + 3CuCl2(aq)  –>   2AlCl3(aq) + 3Cu(s)    (Equation 1)

Cu(s)  + AlCl3(aq)     –>    No Reaction             (Equation 2)

The reaction of aluminum with copper (II) chloride (Equation 1) is classified as a single replacement reaction – aluminum reacts with and “replaces” copper ions in copper (II) chloride. Single replacement reactions will occur spontaneously in one direction only (compare Equations 1 and 2). A more active metal always replaces the ion of a less active metal. In general, the activity of a metal may be defined as follows:

An active metal will react with a compound of a less active metal, which is converted to its “free element” form. The more active metal forms a new compound containing metal cations. Based on Equation 1, aluminum is more active than copper and therefore replaces the copper (this is called a single replacement reaction). 


Objective:

-To explore the reactivity of metals 
-To practice writing single replacement reactions
-To practice using the activity series chart in your reference table

Procedure:

1.  Click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.
teachchemistry.org/classroom-resources/metals-in-aqueous-solutions-simulation
2.  Click Activity 1.
3.  Click CONTINUE at the bottom.  
4.  Pick Mg metal and click CONTINUE.
5.  Click on each beaker to see the “molecular scale”
6.  In data table 1,  if a reaction occurred, write “reaction.” If no reaction occurs write “no reaction”.
7.  In table 2, write the balanced equations for the reactions that occured.  (Hint: these are single replacement reactions)

8.  Now repeat steps 1-7 for the next three metals (Cu, Zn and Ag).

Data/Results:

TABLE 1

Picture

TABLE 2

Picture

Questions:

1.  Which of the metals reacted with the most solutions?

2.  Which of the metals reacted with the fewest solutions?

3.  List the 4 Metals in order from the most reactive to the least reactive.

4.  Refer to table J in your reference table.  This is the activity series which lists the most reactive metals on top and the least reactive on the bottom.  Compare your answer to question #3 with the activity series.  Are your results in the same order?  Why?  (Click here for Table J)

5.  If we added Pb to the list, which of the solutions would you expect it to react with?

All these information above for illustration make  a report based on the youtube link https://youtu.be/VatDpKMJ-BU 
And the rubric 

Chemistry

Chemistry

Please complete the following steps for your discussion post and response.

  • Look around your house or work for a type of medicine that requires a dosage.
  • Discuss the medicine, including its name, use, concentration, or dosage.
  • Include a picture of the active ingredient in the drug.
  • Derive and solve a dosage problem based on the medicine that you choose.
    • For example, your physician ordered 2.4 g of folic acid. Folic acid is available at 800 mg per tablet. How many tablets should be taken?
    • Substitute your medicine to create your own problem and then solve it.
    • Make sure to show your work.
  • Lastly, create a dosage problem for a classmate to solve.  Do not solve it yourself.

Please be sure to validate your opinions and ideas with citations and references in APA format.

How to Download Free Ringtones to Your Cell Phone

How to Download Free Ringtones to Your Cell Phone

You can download free ringtones to your cell phone and customize them with your own music. The process is simple and inexpensive. To get started, you first need to find a ringtone that you like. There are several ringtone sites https://sonneriefrance.com/ that provide dozens of options. Some of these sites will charge you a fee for ringtones created from popular songs, but others will let you use free songs. Older songs may be free because they have passed their copyright expiration date or have fallen into the public domain. Once you’ve chosen a ringtone, you can install it on your phone through a data cable or wireless transmission.

Ringtones came into existence when the first mobile phones were made. A user could customize the sound of incoming calls, allowing them to make the call sound more personal. Back then, the selection of factory preset sounds was limited and there wasn’t much choice. Eventually, a man named Vesku Paananen decided to make a business of ringtones, and the rest is history.

Ringtones can be downloaded as realtones or supertones. A realtone is a recorded audio file. These files are typically in MP3 or AAC format. They’re also often called “mastertones” or “realtones,” and are compatible with most modern cell phones. If you want to download free ringtones, look for a website that features a wide variety of songs. You can even specify a time frame in which the ringtone should play.

Apple has several applications that make it easy to create custom ringtones. One such app is Sound Studio, which allows you to create ringtones from audio files. It even supports streaming music using Apple Music. Sound Studio is available from the Dock and Finder, so you can easily import your favorite music. Once you’ve selected the audio file, you can edit it and save it as a ringtone. The app is free, but it contains ads.

Ringtones are a great way to personalize your cell phone. You can even make them unique and specific for each contact. For example, you can set unique ringtones for friends and family members. Ringtones can also help you identify who is calling by the tone they hear. You can also use a ringtone converter to create your own music.

Ringtones can be simple or complex, and you can choose what best matches your mood or personality. For example, shorter sounds will let you know when you’ve received an incoming SMS or email, while longer sounds will indicate that a phone call has arrived. Ringtones can also be polyphonic, which means that different sounds are generated for each incoming call.