ho to interview?

1.Who to interview?

Select someone in whom you are genuinely

interested in learning more about their past or current job. Make sure

you able to set up a time to interview this person.

2.Make contact.

If you are reaching out to a person you found online or

someone you don’t know via email, make sure to write a professional,

polite email (err on the side of formality).

3.Prepare your questions in advance.

Have a neatly written list and a

plan to take organized notes.

4.If you want to record the session, make sure to ask permission.

5.Take notes as carefully as you can

, and then, if you haven’t recorded,

make sure to type up or rewrite a fuller version of your notes the

same

day

, so you don’t forget information.

Developing Your Questions

1.What do you want to know? At this point, do not worry about the

phrasing; simply brainstorm what you hope to learn from conducting

this interview

General Guide to Questions

2

a.Reword yes/no questions or any question that will lead the

respondent to give a really short answer. You want to get them

talking.

b.Break multi-part questions into separate questions (ex: “Tell me

about the last time you volunteered, how long you volunteered,

and what you valued most about the experience.”) Multi-part

questions are hard for a respondent to answer.

c.Avoid leading questions that give the respondent the sense that

there’s a certain answer you want. (ex. “Don’t you love helping

people find jobs in nursing? What do you love about it?” … the

respondent could actually dislike it, but you didn’t leave room for

them to first express an opinion).

d.Make sure your questions are specific and not vague.

e.Know you may need to ask questions in different ways to fully

learn what you would like to know

f.Be prepared to ask follow-up questions for some of your

questions, so you can get a dialogue going.

Categories

—These categories are meant to help you develop questions.

Depending on the nature of your interview, you may have more than three in

some categories and fewer than three in others.

Remember as you develop questions that you can ask questions about the

past, present, and the future, though you are likely to get more specific,

richer responses to questions about the past and present.

Remember too, that this is a brainstorming activity, and not all these

questions will make it into your final interview.

a.Experience/behavior questions- Basic questions like, “how long

have you been at this job? What is a typical day like?” These

questions are generally easy to answer and are often good

questions to begin your interview.

i.

ii.

iii.

b.

Opinion/values- Questions getting at subjects opinions and

values about their job. As stated above, avoid leading questions

3

like, “why do you love your job?” A better approach would be to

ask about both likes and dislikes.

i.

ii.

iii.

c.

Feeling questions- Questions asking subjects how their job and/or

specific aspects of their jobs make them feel.

i.

ii.

iii.

d.

Knowledge questions- These questions may be better answered

by research than by asking your subject. This includes questions

regarding history of the job, future of the job, average salary,

etc.

i.

ii.

iii.

e.

Sensory questions- Questions asking about sights, smells,

sounds, etc.

i.

ii.

4

iii.

f.

Hypothetical questions- Questions framed as hypotheticals, e.g.

“what advice would you give to a niece considering going into

your field? Do members of your profession in general…” These

questions can be a good way to ask about more sensitive topics.

i.

ii.

iii.

g.

Background/demographic questions

i.

ii.

iii.

Consider Question Order

– Looking at the questions above, pick

at least 12

to ask. Keep in mind that with follow up questions, you should end up asking

more than 12 questions.

Some things to consider when developing question order:

1.

Which of your questions are easiest to answer? It can be good to start

with easy questions to build rapport with your subject.

2.

Do any of your questions need to be asked earlier because other

questions depend on the answer?

3.

Are any of the questions related and need to be asked in sequence?

4.

Do any of the questions need to be asked separately so the answers do

not influence each other?

5

5.

Should any questions be asked at the end because they are of a

summary or culminating nature?

Write questions in order below.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

6

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

Final Question Self/Peer Review Checklist

– Be sure to complete this step

before interviewing. Go through this checklist for each interview question

and revise as needed. The wording of your questions matters!

____ This question is not a yes/no question.

____ This question does not have multiple parts.

____ This question is specific, not vague.

____ This question is not leading the respondent to a specific answer

____ This question makes sense at this point in the interview.


>>
<<
What our clients say
Daphne Whitby
Daphne Whitby
My homework required that I use Java to produce a programming assignment. I’ve been running up and down with friends and workThank you for  your help 
Arnold M
Arnold M
This site did honor their end of the bargain. I have been searching for a college essay help services for a while, and finally, I found the best of the best.
Regina Smith
Regina Smith
I received my essay early this morning after I had placed an order last night. I was so amazed at how quickly they did my work. The most surprising thing is that I was not asked to pay for extra due to the short notice!! I am a happy student